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always spoke of russia in negative terms. of course i did not like that. that is why i was rooting for obama to win. >> obama always said he did not want another cold war, and that is a huge positive for the relationship between the u.s. and russia. the reaction from the kremlin was less enthusiastic. after putin was reelected, several meetings were scheduled and then canceled until he finally met with obama this summer. moscow was struggling to maintain its status as a world power, and that has made for confrontation with washington on a number of issues, from the war in syria to missile defense in europe. >> here, that ties are viewed as the norm, but that is not normal. it does damage. it prevents russia from fulfilling important tasks, especially the long-overdue process of modernization. >> right now, putin is keeping tight control on things at home, and he uses his opposition to america to rally the masses behind him. >> for more on what the president's reelection means for u.s. foreign policy, we are joined in the studio by markets of the swp german institute for internation
between germany and russia by some measures is at its worst in decades. has there been a real break down between russia and the west as pew ten has come back into office? >> i don't believe there's been a break down. i think the perception of russia has been difficult from western investors. when you see human rights case come up, people get a bit more nervous. but general employeeliemployee russia is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayl emplo russia is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayemploye russia is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todaymployee russia is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayployee a is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayloyee i is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayoyee i is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayyee i f st
were reported killed in this attack alone. russia's foreign minister met with jordan's foreign minister. he also held private talks with the former syrian prime minister. the former assad ally defected to the opposition in august. he faces tough questions about why russia continues to supply assad with weapons. >> we are only honoring contracts that were agreed some time ago. the supplies have nothing to do with the current conflict. they are merely supposed to help syria provide for its own defense. that includes defending itself against air attacks. >> that sort of rhetoric rings hollow to many in syria. for them, the deaths of friends and family have become a daily reality. >> in germany, reports are coming in the prosecutors are bringing charges against a surviving member of a suspected neo-nazi terror cell. >> he is suspected of being a member of a cell that killed at least 10 people, nine of them with immigrant roots between 2000 and 2007. both of his accomplices committed suicide last year. the murder spree caused outrage in the country and prompted the country to overhaul securi
asked my teenage daughter what is going on with russia? it is a soviet union. what is that? it was of big things back then before toppled most of us had never considered iraq of saddam hussein but winning was a foregone conclusion and terrorism took us by subplot -- surprise. we thought they were rabble rouser is. the bin laden construction company how is that for irony? >> but after that things change with the world trade center bombing and september september 11th i was flying that morning. coming in from another rotation and september 10th was our first day back. essentially flying and i had come down nearly and somebody said you have to look at this. i thought what moron of the pilot could hit the tower of that size on a clear day? i thought it was an accident. then the second plane hit they sent us up to close down the airspace of the united states. that is eerie as the pilot. "o.o.p.s." is the name of the book. stephen frantzich is a professor at the u.s. naval academy and is the author. what does that stand for? >> of serving our politicians stumble. i said i need to
would win. there is a growing feeling in russia that the relationship between russia and the united states, since the end of the cold war, is developing according to certain cycles. it is a style of relationship that will be repeated over time. of course, the person matters. it will be easier to deal with obama, but i do not think the we can extract some profound change. even if mitt romney won, it would not be such a big difference. >> right, the key issue was the head of many of the imminent issues. like syria. >> yes, syria. syria, most likely will continue to be a central relationship. but this is a current affair that will likely be settled in another way. the problem is that we do not have any new agenda with the united states, we are still digesting the remnants of the cold war. >> sorry that we cannot speak longer. it was good to get your perspective. thank you. much more reaction coming through all the time, that is it from washington, d.c. for now. we have had an extraordinary night, let's remind ourselves of the highlights of this u.s. presidents election. >> i just calle
. it scares me sometimes. >> last time we spoke you said you were investing in russia. you still are? >> i'm looking for investments in russia. i don't have anything there yet. it's not that easy for me to find things in russia. partly because i'm a little lazedy these days. i don't work as hard as i used to. >> oh. okay. >> all right. so -- >> maybe -- >> let's put politics aside. what are you doing? tell me about your portfolio. let's get right down to it. what do you like, what are you long, what are you short? >> i'm, today, tomorrow -- today here, tomorrow there -- i'm going to short more bonds, more u.s. government bonds. i'm going to buy more commodities, buy metals, base metals and precious metals. looks to me like the money printing is going to run amok now. and the spending is going to run amok now. again, larry, i'm not saying this is good for the world, it's not good for anybody. this is what's going to go on. i have to invest based on what's happening, not on what i would like. >> mr. rodgers, rick santelli here. what about europe? i don't disagree with your notion you want to
in russia, dmitry medvedev expressed relief that man who called russia the top geopolitical foe mitt romney did not win the vote. vladimir putin graduated obama it's hard to guess how he really feels. >> kremlin and putin, the presence of russia is not about showing its emotion or putin about showing his. >> he may remember this moment well. >> after my election, i have more flexibility. >> israel's prime minister benjamin netanyahu supported mitt romney said he will continue to work with president obama and says security cooperation between the two countries is rock solid. arab views are mixed. >> i do believe he is well-advised when he comes to the middle east and that is the problem. they don't know how to get up. they don't know how to deal with the -- [ inaudible ] of political and military intervention. >> mixed with the congratulations of world leaders came reminders of the urgent work that needs to be done from stabilizing the global economy and finding revolution to the bloody conflict in syria. certain international initiatives put on hold until november 7. bret? >> bret: amy kell
's re-election will have a positive impact on russia's ties with the united states. israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu has congratulated obama. in a statement he said he'll continue to work with the u.s. president to ensure interests vital for the security of israel's citizens. the two leaders are divided over how to deal with iran's nuclear ambitions. the u.s. is urging netanyahu not to take military action. palestinian president mahmoud abbas also released a statement saying he hopes obama will continue his efforts to achieve peace in the middle east. >>> the elite officials in charge of china are gathering in beijing to chart the country's future. the communist party is about to begin its transition of power. hu jintao and other leaders who have been at the top for a decade are stepping aside. and the next generation is taking over. the 18th congress of the chinese communist party starts thursday. the meeting happens every five years. delegates will approve new policies and appoint new party leaders for the five years to come. chinese authorities waited until the eve of
: russia welcomed the news. china's leaders say they're optimistic a second obama term will give both a time to improve their relationship. israel's prime minister says he will continue to work with president obama to protect the citizens. british prime minister david cameron was in the middle east when the results came in. he vowed to work with president obama to end the syrian conflict and bring stability to the region. >> one of the first things is how we much do more to solve the crisis. >> reporter: the results dominated presses. president obama has huge support in europe. one poll shows that if europeans could vote, nine out of ten would choose obama. >> i'm very pleased. i wanted obama to win and i'm glad he got back again. >> i was surprised actually. i thought romney might win. >> reporter: while some brits waited to read about the results, many americans stayed up all night to wait for a winner. >> . he is just absolutely magnificent. >> reporter: a london pub handed out maps to u.s. spotters who couldn't be home to celebrate. monica villamizar, cbs news, london. >> embassie
but said he hopes the pe impact on russia's ties with the united states. israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu has congratulated obama. in a statement he said he'll continue to work with the u.s. president to ensure interests vital for the security of israel's citizens. the two are divided over how to deal with israel's. mahmoud abbas also released a statement saying he hopes obama will continue his efforts to achieve peace in the middle east. >>> the lead officials in charge of china are gathering in beijing to chart the country's future. the communist party is about to begin its transition of power. hu jintao and other leaders who had been at the top for a decade are stepping aside. the next generation is taking over. the 18th congress of the chinese communist party starts thursday. the meeting happens every five years. delegates will approve new policies and appoint new party leaders for the five years to come. chinese authorities waited until the eve of the congress to confirm details of this year's gathering. nhk world's michitaka yamaka in beijing has more. >> reporter: chinese
, the house had one bill on the agenda, the bill that would normalize u.s. trade relations with russia and that passed by a vote of 365-43. the senate has yet to take up their version of the measure. a capitol hill reporter fills in the details. >> sports of this bill normalizing trade relations with russia are saying it's long overdue and good for the nation's economy. why is that? >> well, it >> it will hopefully double exports to russia from the united states. it will go across a broad group of products. manufacturers are backing it strongly. it could be airplanes and parts associated with that. locomotives, chemicals, food, clothing. it seems russia likes u.s. products. we expect there to be good and quick growth. >> how is lining up to oppose it? >> it has wide support on capitol hill. even the administration backs the bill. it does seem to have broad support across washington and the country for businesses that want to export products to russia. >> with all of the legislation and that remains to be done in the lame-duck session, this is the first one. what are the prospects in th
romney goes to russia, secretly sends message to putin to ignore his dad's campaign rhetoric. dad's a douche. >> he's a douche. >> stephanie: not evil. this week, mitt romney's son traveled -- reports say allayed any concerns the russian government had about his father's harsh stance on russia. he said rusch sha our number one -- russia, our number one geopolitical foe. >> we have known that for some time. >> matt has business in russia from what i understand. >> stephanie: while in moscow, he told a russian -- to pute than despite campaign rhetoric, his father wants good relations if he becomes president. [ buzzer ] >> stephanie: my dad's a liar. everyone in america knows it. >> my dad's a jerk! can't even have good relations with england. let alone russia. >> stephanie: all right. joyce in shreveport, louisiana. hi joyce. >> caller: hello. >> stephanie: hi. >> caller: i'm calling because i'm an elected official in shreveport and i have at least 30,000 voters in my district. i want to know why the media is s
to the minister to russia, the first minister to russia and he couldn't speak french at the time it was in the language of international diplomacy, it was also the language spoken in the russian court, the russian devotees. francis couldn't speak french. the young john quincy could come in and he asked john adams can they take him with him to st. petersburg as the secretary of the litigation, and at 16 years of age john quincy adams goes up to st. petersburg and spends the year up there. in the wintertime it was too cold to venture out, said john quincy adams on his own had this insatiable appetite for learning on his own he read and studied the date volume history name wind by david hume, the six volumes of edward gibbons to fall in the roman empire and adams met's to volume work on the wealth of nations, the great economic work. he kept studying latin and he read all of the poet's and read cicero and read the english poets. he had a sensational appetite for learning and a 69 was still studying kunkel wrigley. i went to yale instead of harvard. ischemic but i take it as a politi
of this -- also the building of international coalitions. russia will be a big player. and on iran, what are our international allies, partners, the guys we do business with at the u.n. -- where is everyone else prepared to be before we go forward? host: on russia, this is the "wall street journal." the defeat was a relief in russia because mitt romney had called moscow the number one political foe of the u.s. it was added that mr. vladimir putin sent a telegram to mr. obama that the kremlin said was secret until the u.s. revealed the contents. dmitry medvedev posted a "congratulations" on twitter. so that was from russia. another foreign policy issue is china. here is the "new york times." warm words from china with a subtext of warning. robust relationships with china while maintaining traditional military ties with the u.s. we do not want to be forced to choose between beijing and washington but what is going on here? guest: it has to be looked at in the context of the campaign that just ended. china emerged as a symbol -- for romney, obama's regas overseas, his inability to stand up to this
coalitions. russia will be a big player. and on iran, what are our international allies, partners, the guys we do business with at the u.n. -- where is everyone else prepared to be before we go forward? host: on russia, this is the "wall street journal." the defeat was a relief in russia because mitt romney had called moscow the number one political foe of the u.s. it was added that mr. vladimir putin sent a telegram to mr. obama that the kremlin said was secret until the u.s. revealed the contents. dmitry medvedev posted a "congratulations" on twitter. so that was from russia. another foreign policy issue is china. here is the "new york times." warm words from china with a subtext of warning. robust relationships with china while maintaining traditional military ties with the u.s. we do not want to be forced to choose between beijing and washington but what is going on here? guest: it has to be looked at in the context of the campaign that just ended. china emerged as a symbol -- weaknessy, obama's overseas, his inability to stand up to this rising asian power. the united states and china
: thank you for being here. >> thank you. lou: next russia's leading newspaper on president obama and those who voted for him not flattering. noted obama backer seemingly working hard to prove the point. that is next. it up tomorrow, abc news white house correspondent with his new book. we will be talking about that. former federal prosecutor and former u.s. ambassador to the united nations among our guests. coming right up, the "a-team" on the republican rebellion against what. who is this guy? grover norquist -- grover norquist. suddenly being blamed for everything. the capital one cash rewards card gives you 1% cash back on all purchases, plus a 50% annual bonus. and everyone...but her likes 50% more cash. but i'm upping my game. do you want a candy cane? yes! do you want the puppy? yes! do you want a tricycle? yes! do you want 50 percent more sh? no! ♪ festive. [ male announcer ] the capital one cash rewards card gives you 1% cash back on every purchase plus a 50% annual bonus on the cash you earn. it's the card for people who like more cash. what's in your wallet? ♪ lou:
from the beginning. i thought he may have voted the same way barack did. he went from labeling russia, which he recently called the soviet union, labeling russia are most significant geopolitical foe -- let me tell you something, he also was opposed to the new start treaty which every single solitary former republican secretary of state, republican national security adviser, republican secretary of defense was for. he was against it. he said he would have never supported it. all of a sudden -- i tell you. it is amazing. we can work with russia, we can be very close with russia. [laughter] he went from harshly criticizing us to saying we will and we will turn over for responsibility to the afghan military at the end of 2014. [applause] he went from saying we should never have set a timetable, he would not do that. i had a debate, too, with ryan. [applause] in my day, he was talking about more troops in the east, more americans would be there -- we should not have set a date. then along comes romney -- my generation has gone on the wings of a snow white dove, preaching -- preaching love
stands on russia and china and iran where he says president obama should have backed the iranian democracy movement and imposed tougher sanctions on iran sooner. >> in my opinion, the president's mistakes on iran are in part responsible for the fact that iran is closer to a nuclear weapon today than it was when he was elected. >> the one word i would use to describe his foreign policy would be tough minded. >> and on august 11th, 2012, in norfolk, virginia, the final piece of the romney campaign falls into place. >> president obama promised to begin to slow the rise of the oceans. and to heal the planet. my promise is to help you and your family. >> with the nomination in hand >> this is not about me. it's not about him. this is about america, the country we love. it's in trouble. it needs our help. >> come november 6th, the american voters will make their decision. >> thank you so much.
with russia, two women appointed to the supreme court including the first hispanic supreme court justice in this nation's history. all of that was all accomplished in the first two years of his presidency. and then came the 2010 midterms and the house went to the republicans. and they pledged to oppose everything the president did. that logger heads between the the house republicans and the white house brought us to crises like the debt ceiling fight where republicans refused to raise the debt ceiling even they voted to do so under republican presidents. they refused to do it under this president and brought about the almost unthinkable downgrading of the country's credit rating. even opposition that entractable cannot stop a presidency in its tracks. colin powell's endorsement more than a week ago put part of this legacy of this presidency as in sync as it could get. >> i also saw the president get us out of one war, start to get us out of a second war and didn't get us into any new wars. >> president obama did get all american combat troops out of iraq by the end of 2011. he killed osa
in a different america, they'll grow up in a fundamentally different world, a world ordered by china or russia or most likely nobody at all. so there's a lot at stake here in how our economy grows and develops. part of that is going to require pulling back from missions that are completely out of proportion like afghanistan. but it's also remembering one thing: we have one unique thing that the chinese and rsians n't have. we can lead by emulation. the chinese have to buy people, the russians have to bludgeon people and when we get it right, when people see us as the greatest place to get an education, start a company and get a job the effect that has in expanding our power and influence is exponential. >> rose: where does american leadership express itself in terms of going beyond its own borders. david? >> first the old-fashioned truth is power does matter and litary does matter. we'll have a military presence for that. dealing with iran is going to be the number one issue the next president faces. and then finally-- and i think this again-- the blurring between that policy is that we have a
states in late october. russia's navy commander announced that on june 1st russian nuclear-powered subs would return to patrolling the world's oceans. lou: fox news national security correspondent. joining me now, former u.s. ambassador. off the coast of a ron. this was peculiar at best. >> is timing may be coincidental. something to do with the elections. what he said when i asked why this information was not released. because of a classified nature of that activity. then normally would not release this information. i think that is strange credulity, but i do think it did not want to make an active war. they probed, tried to shoot it down, failed. it does not say much for their capabilities. lou: your thoughts. >> well, i think it is outrageous that the justification for not releasing the information before the election was that the mission was classified. it is okay to release today. i think that demonstrates this is simply a pretext. i think that what we have here is the clear indication that they are prepared to try to shoot down u.s. drones. it did find one u.s. drone on its territ
israel and the moss. no doubt about it. lou: thank you for being here. >> thank you. lou: next russia's leading newspaper on president obama and those who voted for him not flattering. noted obama backer seemingly working hard to prove the point. that is next. it up tomorrow, abc nws white house correspondent with his new book. we will be talking about that. former federal prosecutor and former u.s. ambassador to the united nations among our guests. coming right up, the "a-team" on the reublican rebellion against what. who is this guy? grover norquist -- grover norquist. we use this board to compare car insurance rates side by side so you get the same coverage, often for less. that's one smart board. what else does it do, reverse gravity? [ laughs ] [ laughs ] [ whooshing ] tell me about it. why am i not going anywhere? you don't believe hard enough. a smarter way to shop around. now that's progressive. call or click today. [ grunting ] but don't just listen to me. listen to these happy progressive customers. i pluggein snapshot, and 30 days later, with snapshot, i knew what i could s
in russia. >> sean: for example, if somebody is a virgin till they're married they're considered odd. people in greater numbers live together. >> right. >> sean: abortion on demand is settled, at least according to the polls -- you add gaymarriag. you're a pastor. those are things you disagree with, right? >> absolutely i disagree with. what i don't agree with is that the way to stop them is law. i tell you why. because by the time something gets into the water, it's already downstream. politics is always downstream from culture. when you start making a law to stop this, stop that, it's already in the culture. >> sean: you met president obama back in 2008. i know you don't like to get in politics. just say you don't want to answer if you don't want to answer. what do you think of him, how he's governed? >> i think
be the job for you. >> reporter: while russia today carries a typical quote, the whole process american elections is fundamentally anti-democratic. in rural kenya, a bull fight. one named obama, the other romney. but make no mistakes, many the world over see this election as hugely important to them. >> america's the powerhouse of the world. the sooner america's better, the sooner the world's better. >> i'd love to see a great pickup in the u.s., more than anything. europe has stalled. >> reporter: does this really affect business day to day, internationally? >> yes, seriously, very important indeed. not just the business but also for the markets. it's all about confidence. it doesn't matter who wins, it's making sure we get a clear decision one way or the other. >> reporter: on security, many see the american stance as directly affecting them. >> the u.s. role which is in effect one of the policemen the world is something that has to be rethought. whether it's affordable. >> reporter: in europe, 75% of voters would choose obama. in israel, polls strongly favor romney who has vocally su
convention more people were also arrested demanding a fair, russia, comprehensive immigration policy. -- rational, comprehensive immigration policy. what you think will happen now? the supposedly is a lot of soul- searching in the republican party because there were so badly beaten. what is the shape of policy you see? what are the issues that must be hit to make a comprehensive, satisfactory policy in this country? >> i think what you're seeing -- i'm glad you mention the 2006 protests. i said back then that was the coming of age of the latino community in the united states, that series of protests. i am willing to bet a months pay that every one of these elections at the local level across the country this week, the young latinos that were involved with organizing the campaigns, that many of them were participants in those protests and were really inspired to get into political activity as a results of the immigrant protest in 2006, and the frustration they felt was six years passing and nothing has been changed in immigration. hopefully, what will come of this new coalition is not
, whether that's the multi-lateral process with russia, china, britain, fans, and germany involved, but also possibly see if there should be direct talks between the united states and iran. we haven't had those kind of talks really in three decades since the iranian revolution started, and i suspect, suzanne, he will have bipartisan support for that in washington d.c. and he will have a lot of support internationally now that the campaign is over. the big question is whether the iranian government will be willing to come in a serious way to the negotiating table. they have not shown that over the last couple of years. i think the pressure is actually going to be on the iranian government. >> do you think that the economic pressure on iran is coming to a breaking point here, a boiling point, where you will see iran come to the table? >> i think the sanctions are beginning to hit the iranian government very hard. both the e.u., oil embargo, the u.s. central bank sanctions, and just look at the indicators of that. the iranian riel, the -- it has been -- the ranian have been hit hard in their in
with us, who may do less harm in the future, hopefully never, russia is one, a lot of computers, russia is much like we are in terms of understanding of the cyber threat, having a lot of smart people doing offensive development primarily for the purpose of -- think of how many ways we can be attacked. also thinking for every measure there is a countermeasure. how do we defend ourselves against potential attacks? we are being proactive and reactive at the same time. putting a lot of money and effort into our government to create a u.s. cyber command. the russians have institutionalize this and have buildings and people and very smart individuals designing ways to disrupt and corrupt systems and do bad things, as we are to our potential adversaries. that mutually assured destruction may be still works between russia and the united states. now let's take a quick look at one of the worst place today in the world -- north korea. they have got atomic bombs, they are a rogue regime, a lot of people there, a lot of smart people, like there are everywhere in the world. they have definitely got a
. >> john: you grew up in russia. >> grew up in russia. didn't have the hostess. came here. >> john: you eat only healthy food. >> that's right. other russian flavors hostess doesn't make. so i've steered clear. and my understanding is nobody really -- i don't really understand, nobody still eats hostess as a practice of -- if we want baked goods we buy hostess. am i wrong? >> john: no one eats hostess caifntle. >> they do eat the coast es cakes but it is not seen as a delicious dessert. >> john: it is. twinkies have a shelf life of seven years because they have so many preservatives in them. i want to feed someone nothing but twinkies the last ten years of their life and see how long it takes their body to decompose when they die. between twinkies and ho hos which dick morris is a fan and chock codials, i don't know if they make those anymore but the cupcakes are still huge. hostess sells wonder bread so maybe you don't have kids -- >> don't have kids. >> john: children still love this crap. >> childre
a nuclear threat was a real problem. but during those days, the cold war really focused on russia and the united states. two powerhouses. so fast toward, you have a vietnam. many of you may have served in vietnam. then you fast forward and we were going to have russia, the berlin wall came down. we were going to get some benefits of that peace dividend. peace dividend in the intelligence community was multiple stance. so picky stand, they became a challenge in terms of one's ability of government, stability of resources and data we know about those particular companies. move on forward, 9/11 happens. everyone of you in this room remembers where you work. i was on the steps of the pentagon. i literally walked out of the building and was there for a meeting and i remember hearing on that gorgeous day an eerie sound. it was like a plane took a wrong turn but i did not know it was a plane. because planes go up and down the potomac regularly. the next thing i knew, i was on the bottom of the stairs and i'm thinking how they get from the top to the bottom of the stairs? the plane had hi
diplomacy. this is something that really works. i try to expand it to russia, which i think is kind of a cool idea, but got shut down by the embassy. but at any rate, it's a great idea, needs to be bigger. used to be the chairman of the bbc. has been impossible mission -- and possible because this has to do two things at the same time that are very difficult to reconcile, although in my view it's an excellent job of records failing. number one, it is a tool of american foreign policy. number two, it is a real, journalistic institution that needs to abide by normal journalistic principles. so how can he do both of those the same time? well, it is hard especially if you have members of congress who don't understand what the law actually says. so i've actually come around to the view, which i never stated before and i kind of have resisted this for a long time. they really do think it needs to be much more -- needs to be brought into the broader foreign policy making apparatus of the united states government. otherwise i don't think it's going to survive. so i think that tension needs
critical level. this here comment usaid was booted out of russia initially when i went there to help the russian people, one of the first things they did with the help of the russians to two extreme poverty. my question is, is the risk too much for us so that we would basically go winhelp the nation and state thank you and don't let the door hit you on the way out? thank you. >> first of all, the indonesian case, part of that is just cultural. they are far more sensitive to questions of faith than we are. so it's not infrequent that we would behave in a way that doesn't take into account adequately their cultural sensitivities. but this happens all the time in life and i think you have to ask yourself what's the right thing to do and you try and do it. if you make your very best effort and someone isn't appreciative, you didn't do anything wrong. don't worry about it. and sometimes that happens. i wouldn't hesitate to help people because someone related to a recipient is resentful that they weren't helped by their own kind. i would want to help. >> if i could have something to the in
to go into exile. he spoke in an interview with "russia today.v." earlier this week, british prime minister david cameron suggested giving assad safe passage out of syria, if that would guarantee an end to the war. but the syrian leader flatly rejected the idea. he said, "i am syrian and i will live and die in syria." those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: after the vote, where does the republican party go from here? one thing it clearly faces: a changing electorate. exit polls showed that mitt romney lost every demographic-- blacks, hispanics, and asians-- other than white voters, who favored the republican nominee. romney won among older voters, buthe esident led among those under age 44. and he captured 60% of the 18- to 29-year-old vote, which turned out in greater numbers than in 2008. exit polls also sampled attitudes on the tea party. 21% said they support the movement. 30% opposed it and 42% declared themselves neutral. we do our own sampling now, with three party members: leslie sanchez, a republican strategist and author of "los republican
it will be a fundamentally different world by china or russia or most likely nobody at all. there's a lot at stake here on how our economy goes and develops. part of that is pulling mac bitions out of proportion like afghanistan. it's also remembering one thing. we have one unique thing that the chinese and russians don't have. we can lead by emlation. the chinese have to find people the chinese have to bludgenon people -- exponential. >> rose: where does american leadership express itself in terms of going beyond its own borders? david. >> first the old fashion truth is that power does matter and the military does power. filling the space in is asia, we have military presence important that. dealing with iran is the number one issue the next president faces. you got to have some military presence for that. and then finally and i think this goes along with what people have been saying the blur between that and foreign domestic paul z we have lots of countries around the world facing crises. so we all have sort of similar problems whether it's japan, europe, us, even to some extent china which is aging
, yeah. >> i mean, not like russia, the soviet union -- >> oh, it's -- >> not that blanket -- >> entirely different. it's most of the time the areas the government cares about, the internet, democratic protest or whatever, taiwan, tibet, they're all over. when it doesn't involve that, you know, you can basically do what you want. you start a business, et cetera. so we want them to allow their people to have more a sort of liberal, normal life, as times goes on, which i -- and the government it's a country becoming more confident with a government that's still sort of nervous antique. it's a dick cheney government with, if not a barack obama, an fdr type nation behind it. here's an illustration. before the olympics, the foreign ministry said, "we're going to have an authorized protest zone so that everybody can say," you know, the beijing olympics, four years ago, "we're going to show the world we can tolerate protest." when people applied to protest, they were all arrested. so there's parts of the government that say, "this would look good, to allow a protest." there's parts that say, "we
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